The 10 most BEAUTIFUL flower gardens in the world

  1. Dubai Miracle Garden in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

The Dubai Miracle Garden is a flower garden located in the district of Dubailand, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The garden was launched on Valentine’s Day in 2013. The garden occupies over 72,000 square metres (780,000 sq ft), making it the world’s largest natural flower garden featuring over 50 million flowers and 250 million plants.

In April 2015, the garden was awarded the Moselle Award for New Garden Experiences of the year by the Garden Tourism Award 2015.

2.Keukenhof, Lisse, The Netherlands 

Keukenhof, also known as the Garden of Europe, is one of the world’s largest flower gardens, situated in Lisse, South Holland, Netherlands. According to the official website for the Keukenhof Park, approximately 7 million flower bulbs are planted annually in the park, which covers an area of 32 hectares (79 acres).

Keukenhof is located in South Holland, south of Haarlem and southwest of Amsterdam. It is accessible by bus from the train stations of Haarlem, Leiden, and Schiphol. It is located in an area called the “Dune and Bulb Region” (Duin- en Bollenstreek).

Keukenhof is open annually from mid-March to mid-May. The best time to view the tulips is around mid-April, depending on the weather.

3.Gardens of Versailles, France

 

The Gardens of Versailles occupy part of what was once the Domaine royal de Versailles, the royal demesne of the château of Versailles. Situated to the west of the palace, the gardens cover some 800 hectares of land, much of which is landscaped in the classic French Garden style perfected here by André Le Nôtre. Beyond the surrounding belt of woodland, the gardens are bordered by the urban areas of Versailles to the east and Le Chesnay to the north-east, by the National Arboretum de Chèvreloup to the north, the Versailles plain (a protected wildlife preserve) to the west, and by the Satory Forest to the south.

As part of le domaine national de Versailles et de Trianon, an autonomous public entity operating under the aegis of the French Ministry of Culture, the gardens are now one of the most visited public sites in France, receiving more than six million visitors a year.

4.Gardens of Chateau de Villandry, Indre-et-Loire, France

 

This carefully designed garden has six different parts designed as six terraces to reflect various themes. The topmost terrace is the Sun garden and has a pond shaped like the Sun as well as meadow flowers and lime trees to give a refreshing feeling. The subsequent terraces are designed as a water garden, a herb garden, and an ornamental garden. Each of the levels has ponds and fountains of various shapes which compliment the theme and the plants in the garden. There are shaded areas for visitors to relax and enjoy the view.

5.Nong Nooch Tropical Botanical Garden, Pattaya City, Thailand

 

Nong Nooch Tropical Botanical Garden is a 500-acre (2.0 km2) botanical garden and tourist attraction at kilometer 163 on Sukhumvit Road in Chonburi Province, Thailand. It can be reached via bus, taxi or private land transportation. It is also a major scientific center dedicated to cycads, with its own Cycad Gene Bank.

6.Butchart Gardens, British Columbia, Canada

 

The Butchart Gardens is a group of floral display gardens in Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada, located near Victoria on Vancouver Island. The gardens receive over a million visitors each year. The gardens have been designated a National Historic Site of Canada

7.Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London

 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (brand name Kew) is a non-departmental public body in the United Kingdom sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. An internationally important botanical research and education institution, it employs 723 staff (FTE). Its board of trustees is chaired by Marcus Agius, a former chairman of Barclays.

The organization manages botanic gardens at Kew in Richmond upon Thames in southwest London, and at Wakehurst Place, a National Trust property in Sussex which is home to the internationally important Millennium Seed Bank, whose scientists work with partner organizations in more than 95 countries. Kew, jointly with the Forestry Commission, founded Bedgebury National Pinetum in Kent in 1923, specializing in growing conifers. In 1994 the Castle Howard Arboretum Trust, which runs the Yorkshire Arboretum, was formed as a partnership between Kew and the Castle Howard Estate.

The organization had 2,124,138 public visitors in the year 2016/17. Its 326-acre (132 ha) site at Kew has 40 historically important buildings; it became a UNESCO World Heritage Site on 3 July 2003. The collections at Kew and Wakehurst Place include over 28,000 taxa of living plants, 8.3 million plant and fungal herbarium specimens, and 30,000 species in the seed bank.

8.Giardini Botanici Villa Taranto, Piedmont, Italy

 

The Giardini Botanici Villa Taranto (16 hectares) are botanical gardens located on the western shore of Lake Maggiore in Pallanza, Province of Verbano-Cusio-Ossola, Italy. They are open daily; an admission fee is charged.

The gardens were established 1931-1940 by Scotsman Neil Boyd McEacharn who bought an existing villa and its neighboring estates, cut down more than 2000 trees, and undertook substantial changes to the landscape, including the addition of major water features employing 8 km of pipes. He set the name “Villa Taranto” (Taranto House) in honor of his ancestor Étienne Jacques Joseph Alexandre MacDonald, named Duke of Taranto by Napoleon. They opened to the public in 1952, and after McEacharn’s death in 1964 have been run by a non-profit organization. The Villa Taranto itself is not open to the public; it is used by the government.

9.Longwood Gardens, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Longwood Gardens is an American botanical garden. It consists of over 1,077 acres (436 hectares; 4.36 km²) of gardens, woodlands, and meadows in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, United States in the Brandywine Creek Valley. It is one of the premier horticultural display gardens in the United States and is open to visitors year-round to enjoy exotic plants and horticulture (both indoor and outdoor), events and performances, seasonal and themed attractions, as well as educational lectures, courses, and workshops.

10.Claude Monet’s Garden, Giverny, Northern France

 

 

The magnificent Claude Monet’s garden is located in the Giverny commune of Northern France. This garden is divided into two parts, a flower garden and a water garden. The famous French impressionist painter Claude Monet was one who design this breathtakingly beautiful garden.

Claude Monet and the family settles in Giverny in 1883. He loved the life in calm and beautiful place. As inspired by many Japanese paintings from his collection Monet decided to renovate his garden.

Claude started the designing of his new garden in 1890. With lots of hard work he diverted the river near his house into a beautiful pond garden. He also built a bridge across the bridge. The pond is also filled with water lilies.

 

 

 

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